orissa paintings

Where to buy authentic Pattachitra online?

Where to buy authentic Pattachitra online?

As the internet has improved communication worldwide and facilitated the growth of e-commerce, there is little that distinguishes local from global. There is an expansion of markets, and any art finds an eager audience to lap it up in every corner of the world. With the advent of the online buying process, Odisha’s ethnic art Pattachitra has widely become available online.

But one question raises its head time and again, `how to ensure the authenticity of the Pattachitra you buy online?’ To answer this, we may get some background art of Pattachitra art from Odisha.

   Pattachitra is one of Odisha’s most charming artistic expressions that has snatched the eyeballs in a few worldwide platforms. The topic of the Pattachitra compositions is generally founded on Hindu Folklore and enlivened by Jagannath Sanskruti.

The straightforward issue that Pattachitra artworks are so lively makes them pieces worth having homes, yet particularly in Indian homes. These motifs are so dug in the indigenous Indian culture that a Patta painting observes incredible social and sequential influence over numerous compositions. The brush strokes talk boisterously and gladly, exuding thrill and a romance of a bygone era.

But the sheer exuberance of colors and the mythical story-telling aspect turns them an absolute conversation starter. They can serve as attractive wall décor, table accents, or bric-a-brac of everyday use objects bringing almost instant transformation to any modern-day home.

The GI Tag related to Pattachitra is claimed by Odisha, where a little hamlet called Raghurajpur on the banks of stream Bhargavi close to Puri is a traditional home of Pattachitra artworks. Orissa’s towns are the focuses of the famous Pattachitra canvases, which have bloomed and thrived around the foci of Puri, Konark, and Bhubaneswar. The most nimble types of this living fine art delivering the most impeccably planned Pattachitras are found in this Prachi valley village.

 Points to ascertain the authenticity of Pattachitra if buying online 

So to ensure the art is authentic and buy online Pattachitra, buyers must keep the following points in mind:

*Pattachitra from Odisha owes a great deal to its ubiquity and uniqueness to this little village Raghurajpur, which mainly stays unaltered and stuck to the custom even today. So you must ensure that the seller is sourcing his merchandise from this village.

* The use of natural colors and mythological episodes are de rigor in Pattachitra art, so pay attention to the fact that these are being used to a large extent.

*Pattachitra paintings are entirely handmade, very often taking weeks to complete, the cost of raw materials and labor tend to be on the higher side. Hence it is only feasible that after keeping his/her margin, the seller’s prices seem a little costlier. If not sure, ask the seller if his products are entirely handmade.

*Another tell-tale sign would be to see if the products can be traced back during shipping to India, particularly to the state of Odisha. If yes, then it’s highly likely that they come from an original artisan.

Posted by Pattachitra in Pattachitra Paintings, 0 comments
Odisha’s Pattachitra painting: A living, breathing Art

Odisha’s Pattachitra painting: A living, breathing Art

Traditional visual art from eastern India- the Pattachitra tradition is an integral part of intangible heritage and is an important essence of folk and traditional media. Pattachitra is, therefore, a painting done on canvas, and is manifested by rich, colorful application, creative motifs, and designs, and portrayal of simple themes, mostly mythological in depiction. The traditions of pattachitra paintings are more than a thousand years old. Most of these paintings depict stories of Hindu deities. Thus, Pattachitra forms an important and integral part of traditional and folk media from India especially represented through the Indian states of West Bengal, Odisha, Bihar, and Jharkhand.

Materials used in Pattachitra paintings

 The colors used within the scroll paintings were always and are still mostly made from various elements from nature- e.g.Originally, apart from paper and cloth, sometimes palm-leaf manuscripts were made to paint the scrolls; however, in recent years, this has been substituted completely by the use of paper, dexterously stuck on the cloth to give it more stability and then used as a canvas for drawing.

.Since the materials and tools for the paintings are obtained from natural sources like brushes from mongoose or mouse hair, Pattachitra is a tedious process. The vivacity of the paintings can be ascribed to the enchanting natural colors used. The colors that make the art form more livid and appreciable are made by the chitrakaras (painters) using ancient color drawing techniques.

Yellow is made from turmeric or soil; Green is made from the leaves of hyacinth bean plant or the leaves of wood apple, Purple is from black plum or blackberry, Conch-shell powder or white mud gives the white color, Brown color is obtained from limestone mixed with black catechu, Red is made from vermillion, alata (a reddish or scarlet ink or dye solution used for coloring feet), or terracotta soil, Grey is obtained from the soot from earthen ovens, Blue is obtained from blue seeds- locally known as nil bori, Black is obtained from scrapping the soot off from the outside bottoms of clay pots or even burning rice and pounding it to a powder to which is added home-made glue for required consistency or by burning the roots of the velvet apple trees.

However, in recent times, just as the canvas has taken the shape of papers bought easily from the market many times, the natural colors are also substituted with easily bought acrylic and fabric paints from the market.

This is particularly prominent amidst the Pattachitra scrolls, which are taken out of the villages for displaying in various art exhibitions across the globe. Gum from wood, Apple is extracted in a coconut shell and mixed with natural colors and kept in the bright sunlight to darken. Firstly, the outlines of the painting are drawn on paper with paint and brush.

The painting process

We must understand the entire painting process is laced with divinity, and hence the practitioners follow some traditional rituals during its making. The final canvas created is off-white in color, and the master painter (usually male), also known as chitrakar, begins to paint. He has to be completely vegetarian during the time of painting; he has to sleep on the ground without a mattress and wear a new dhoti while working on the paintings. Small snapshots of these different forms, in different shapes, form the border of the painting, while the center depicts a larger representation of the characters. The pattachitra art form of Bengal is known for its bold colors, lines, and strokes.

The new resurrection of the art form

Recently, animation media picked up stories from oral traditions to make popular television shows, and folk music was explored extensively to blend with popular music for mainstream films from various regions in India- thus, Pattachitra tradition too found a new voice. In Odisha, there has been a spurt of comics book and animation series using this iconic imagery. Groups like srijamahyam have done yeomen work regarding this.

Thus, as Pattachitra from Bengal got to be displayed within New Media- especially through the personal websites of various folk artists as well as patua villages- a transformation evolved within the paradigms of local modes of entertainment- it found a voice within the global platform.

Pattachitra is one of the most alluring art forms of Odisha that has grabbed the eyeballs in several international platforms. The theme of the Pattachitra paintings are mostly based on Hindu Mythology and inspired by Jagannath Sanskruti. During the Hindu festival, Rath Yatra, when the Lord Jagannath and his siblings go on hibernation and the Pattachitra paintings of the deities are worshipped in Sri Mandir. Not just limited to clothes or canvases, but the paintings are engraved on the walls of the localities depicting the Indian mythology (The Ramayanas, Puranas, etc.) and the shrine of Lord Jagannath.

It is interesting to note how, despite a thousand years old legacy, this art keeps going strong and hums with a living, breathing energy.

Posted by Pattachitra in Pattachitra Paintings, 0 comments

Pattachitra Art: Stunning hand-painted home decor product.

Famous folk art of Orissa, cloth bases scroll painting, and aboriginal to Orissa is a best option for home decor.

The simple matter that Pattachitra paintings are so vibrant makes them pieces to have in homes, but especially in Indian homes as they are so entrenched in the indigenous Indian culture. Patta painting beholds significant cultural and chronological leverage over many other types of paintings.

Pattachitra as Home Decor

It’s one’s own discretion to choose an art piece as per one’s own taste and home décor, but essentially, there are six types, based on:

  • Sri Jagannath Pati
  • Great Indian epics
  • Orissa folk lore
  • Animals and birds
  • Eroticism
  • The art of bratas and worship rituals

Pattachitra as Religious Memorabilia

The paintings based on Sri Jagannath Pati and great Indian folks are more traditional, adhering to the purpose of the depiction of the deity and the holy “triad”, or mythologies, respectively. Whilst bright, these kinds of art are also solemn. The best-suited décor that’ll be able to support this sort of art must be mature, and in style preferably earthen, or eclectic, or indigenously traditional to be in harmony with the painting.

Pattachitra as Option of Beautification of Living Room

On the other hand, the Pattachitra paintings based on animals and birds are lighter in pathos, and their purpose is mainly depiction of nature. These paintings are soothing to eyes and soft in their implication. Such paintings are perfect for cottage-style homes, coastal style homes, industrial homes, and country style homes, as they personify leisure and romanticism.

Erotism in Prehistoric Scroll Art

There are erotic Pattachitras which are tamasic in nature, exploring the darker side of nature. This art is bold and finds itself in place in rustic style homes, Tuscan style homes, Moroccan style homes, eclectic style homes, and also indigenous traditional homes.

Source For Positive Energy

Pattachitra painted dhurries, wall-hangings and quaint masks and figurines can fill your yoga area with a lot of spiritual character and ambience.

Besides paintings, Pattachitra is also finding its reaches in many scopes- like statues, artifacts, miscellaneous products such as pots, bookmarks, trinkets, accessories, etc., wall art, and more. They would typically be painted on surfaces as varied as canvas, paper, cloth and wood and even large size murals covering walls and roofs are possible. Such murals are seen in ancient temples of Odisha as part of traditional rituals including the Puri Jagannath temple.

Online Availability for Pattachitra Paintings

Today, the improvements in digital printing have enlarged the scope to transfer these unique designs which have been so far hand-painted unto a diverse set of surfaces. You could choose to have a personally preferred traditional pattachitra image to a t-shirt, handbag, flex, cap or umbrella.

Our Role

We are constantly working with painters from Puri to get a wide range of innovative pattachitra products with the contemporary touch on our website.

We pattachitra.net offer a customized option to our customers. By paying a little more, you can have your select merchandise imprinted with Pattachitra designs for great gifting options.

Role of Government

The Central and state government of Odisha have been relentlessly trying to impart the traditional artists or Chitrkars (Painters) with relevant training to make their craft applicable to modern home décor. This action would make their products have more appeal in the mass market and improve their incomes. Reputed institutes like NIFT and NID are also working with the artisans towards this end.

  

Posted by Pattachitra in Patta-paintings, 0 comments